Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To access to IJP Open with a PEP-Web subscription…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Having a PEP-Web subscription grants you access to IJP Open. This new feature allows you to access and review some articles of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis before their publication. The free subscription to IJP Open is required, and you can access it by clicking here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1977). Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CLXI, 1975: Hysteria, Hypnosis, Psychopathology—History and Perspectives. Léon Chertok. Pp. 367-378.. Psychoanal Q., 46:546.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CLXI, 1975: Hysteria, Hypnosis, Psychopathology—History and Perspectives. Léon Chertok. Pp. 367-378.

(1977). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 46:546

Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CLXI, 1975: Hysteria, Hypnosis, Psychopathology—History and Perspectives. Léon Chertok. Pp. 367-378.

In this elegant survey of the history and extent of our knowledge regarding hysteria and psychopathology, Kubie is quoted with agreement: "Hypnosis is the cross-roads for all levels of physiological and psychological organization." The phenomenon of hypnosis, about which Chertok concludes we really know almost nothing, is seen as central to our understanding of all those mysterious gaps that operate in both directions between mind and body.

Although Charcot clearly demonstrated the psychological etiology of hysteria, an area which was greatly expanded by Freud, the origin of this psychic "dysfunction" remains obscure. Chertok considers the concept of an innate neurophysiological disposition and includes discussion of the work of Marty, Nemiah and Sifneos, and Pavlov. For all these workers, hypnosis, neglected after Freud discarded it for therapeutic reasons, constitutes an important experimental instrument for understanding psychopathological mechanisms. Freud has furnished us with an outline of the "why" of such phenomena as conversion, dissociation, and splitting, but "how" they come about remains the mystery. The author's own postulation is that there is a "fourth organismic state" in addition to the waking state, sleep, and dreaming. This is explained as a natural potentiality or inborn mechanism which is then markedly influenced by the individual's specific psychoaffective development.

- 546 -

Article Citation

(1977). Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. CLXI, 1975. Psychoanal. Q., 46:546

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.