Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see definitions for highlighted words…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Some important words in PEP Web articles are highlighted when you place your mouse pointer over them. Clicking on the words will display a definition from a psychoanalytic dictionary in a small window.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1977). American Imago. XXXIII, 1976: Synge's Ecstatic Dance and the Myth of the Undying Father. Jeanne Flood. Pp. 174-196.. Psychoanal Q., 46:547-548.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: American Imago. XXXIII, 1976: Synge's Ecstatic Dance and the Myth of the Undying Father. Jeanne Flood. Pp. 174-196.

(1977). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 46:547-548

American Imago. XXXIII, 1976: Synge's Ecstatic Dance and the Myth of the Undying Father. Jeanne Flood. Pp. 174-196.

Critics have accepted the idea that Synge's transformation from a severely limited aesthete to the vigorous creator of a new Irish drama resulted from his visits to the Aran Islands. Basing her argument on autobiographical writings and other notes, Flood attributes this transformation to Synge's reaction to a lymph node biopsy performed under ether anesthesia in 1898. Prior to this experience Synge had fantasied that the womb was a dangerous organ and that his birth was

- 547 -

the result of the incorporation and destruction of his father (who had died during Synge's infancy) within the womb; accordingly, Synge defended against fears of his own engulfment and dissolution. The surgery had the unconscious significance of a death and rebirth and gave rise to an alternation in his womb fantasy: there was added an element of immortality in which the man who dies is reborn as his own son. Synge made his first of five annual trips to the Aran Islands the following summer, where he entered into filial relationships with old men who were the repositories and transmitters of ancient poems and narratives. Synge utilized this material for his new drama. As the contemporary repository and transmitter of the ancient literature, Synge united with generations of fathers stretching back into antiquity.

- 548 -

Article Citation

(1977). American Imago. XXXIII, 1976. Psychoanal. Q., 46:547-548

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.