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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Bing, J.F. (1981). The Annual of Psychoanalysis. VI, 1978: Self Representation and the Capacity for Self Care. Henry Krystal. Pp. 209-246.. Psychoanal Q., 50:453.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Annual of Psychoanalysis. VI, 1978: Self Representation and the Capacity for Self Care. Henry Krystal. Pp. 209-246.

(1981). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 50:453

The Annual of Psychoanalysis. VI, 1978: Self Representation and the Capacity for Self Care. Henry Krystal. Pp. 209-246.

James F. Bing

The author summarizes this rather complicated and somewhat repetitious paper fairly well when he states that drug dependent and psychosomatic patients suffer from: 1) a marked disturbance of affect development, and 2) and inability to exercise self-caring functions. Krystal traces these difficulties back to complicated situations during the early developmental period in which the defect is in the mothering process, or at least in the fantasies the developing individual has in respect to the care-taking object. The difficulties in treating such patients result primarily from the fact that they are unable to confront their own aggression without becoming either severely depressed or homicidal, particularly in reference to the therapist. But in a few selected instances, according to the author, intensive psychoanalytic psychotherapy has been able to produce dramatic results, although it demands an enormous amount of patience, tolerance, and empathy on the part of the therapist. Perhaps one of the most stimulating thoughts expressed in this paper is that an individual can no more affect his autonomically controlled organs than one can influence one's organs that are affected by "hysterical paralysis." Such a concept has far-reaching implications.

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Article Citation

Bing, J.F. (1981). The Annual of Psychoanalysis. VI, 1978. Psychoanal. Q., 50:453

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