Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To receive notifications about new content…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Want to receive notifications about new content in PEP Web? For more information about this feature, click here

To sign up to PEP Web Alert for weekly emails with new content updates click click here.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Dowling, S. (1982). Clinical Studies in Infant Mental Health. The First Year of Life: Edited by Selma Fraiberg, with the collaboration of Louis Fraiberg. New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1980. 279 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 51:430-434.

(1982). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 51:430-434

Clinical Studies in Infant Mental Health. The First Year of Life: Edited by Selma Fraiberg, with the collaboration of Louis Fraiberg. New York: Basic Books, Inc., 1980. 279 pp.

Review by:
Scott Dowling

Ever since The Magic Years charmed its way into our parental and professional hearts, each new book or article by Selma Fraiberg and her collaborators has been a special occasion. We have come to expect solid scholarship, ingenious investigative techniques, precise theoretical reasoning, and warm compassion, all presented in a spirited and lucid literary style.

Clinical Studies in Infant Mental Health continues this tradition. The studies reported here began in 1972 in the Child Development Project in Ann Arbor. They grew out of Professor Fraiberg's work with blind infants. The Infant Mental Health Program proposed to provide assessment and treatment services for "disadvantaged infants and their parents." The carefully documented development of these services would comprise the research component of the program. There would be no fees. For those who have worked with socially and economically disadvantaged, severely disturbed infant-mother pairs, the boldness implicit in such an invitation is impressive. This was not to be a survey or consultation service or a well-protected research study. Furthermore, there were no models for program development or for assessment and treatment methods, with the one significant exception of their own program for blind infants. With her small band of co-workers, Professor Fraiberg chose to leap straight into the vortex of the problem, inviting no-fee referrals from all agencies and hospitals of Washtenaw County. The expectable deluge of impossible cases arrived.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.