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Tip: To see Abram’s analysis of Winnicott’s theories…

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In-depth analysis of Winnicott’s psychoanalytic theorization was conducted by Jan Abrams in her work The Language of Winnicott. You can access it directly by clicking here.

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Gunther, M.S. (1983). Clinical Psychoanalysis. Volume III, Downstate Psychoanalytic Institute Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Series: Edited by Shelley Orgel, M.D. and Bernard D. Fine, M.D. New York/London: Jason Aronson, Inc., 1981. 344 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 52:104-107.

(1983). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 52:104-107

Clinical Psychoanalysis. Volume III, Downstate Psychoanalytic Institute Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Series: Edited by Shelley Orgel, M.D. and Bernard D. Fine, M.D. New York/London: Jason Aronson, Inc., 1981. 344 pp.

Review by:
Meyer S. Gunther

This collection of clinical psychoanalytic essays evokes a strange, mixed impression in the reviewer. When a book produces such a reaction, one usually ascribes it to unevenness in the quality of the individual contributions, that is, to differences in the experience, understanding, and native endowment of the authors, and above all to differences in their capacity to communicate their ideas and experiences lucidly. None of these explanations seems adequate here. The authors are singularly experienced clinicians who are widely familiar with current conceptual issues and with psychoanalytic ideas. The writing is clearly focused, expressive, and free from jargon, which in part may be a tribute to the editing.

The subject matter is vital. It covers not only the classical neurotic problems but also the various types of severe neurotic sufferings and severely disturbed object relationships that constitute so much of present-day analytic practice. In addition, there is a special quality to most of the authors' approach to their subject matter; i.e., they show an intense, fresh, avid curiosity about their patients' experiences. The authors reflect cogently on the meaning of what they find in their patients and attempt to relate it to the best, currently available conceptual frameworks. I was especially struck by R. Almansi's paper, "Scopophilia and Separation Anxiety," J. Frank's paper, "A Different Form of Ego State," M. Jackel's "Object Loss and a Wish for a Child," and M. Hurwitz's "Milk without Sucking." In the two more abstract clinical essays, J. Coltrera's on interpretation and R.

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