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Birger, D.S. (1983). The Psychoanalytic Study of Society, VIII. 1979: Dreaming in Kagwahiv: Dream Beliefs and Their Psychic Uses in an Amazonian Indian Culture. Waud H. Kracke. Pp. 119-171.. Psychoanal Q., 52:316.
    
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Psychoanalytic Study of Society, VIII. 1979: Dreaming in Kagwahiv: Dream Beliefs and Their Psychic Uses in an Amazonian Indian Culture. Waud H. Kracke. Pp. 119-171.

(1983). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 52:316

The Psychoanalytic Study of Society, VIII. 1979: Dreaming in Kagwahiv: Dream Beliefs and Their Psychic Uses in an Amazonian Indian Culture. Waud H. Kracke. Pp. 119-171.

Daniel S. Birger

The author reports the results of a thorough investigation of a dream belief system in a primitive society. He demonstrates that individuals in the society will tend to use different elements of the belief system according to their characterological capabilities and needs. The Kagwahiv, dwelling in the Amazon region of Brazil, have specific concepts of dreaming. These concepts consist of viewing dreams as predictors of real life events, as caused by malevolent spirits called "anang," as evidence that someone is thinking of the dreamer, as continuation of nocturnal thinking, or as wish-fulfillment. Three male informants discussed their dream experiences with the author, who described their personality structures and defensive systems. It is clearly demonstrated that the individual will tend to choose the elements of the belief system that will most approximate his ego strengths and the level of his dynamic conflict. The perception of the dream's meaning may serve highly important psychological functions of anxiety-reducing mechanisms and assist in coping with conflictual tensions. The higher the developmental level achieved by the individual, the more insight-oriented his dream comprehension tends to be.

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Article Citation

Birger, D.S. (1983). The Psychoanalytic Study of Society, VIII. 1979. Psychoanal. Q., 52:316

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