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(1983). Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLIII, 1979: Transmission, or the Death Instinct in Institutional Discourse. Jean Guillaumin. Pp. 261-270.. Psychoanal Q., 52:488.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLIII, 1979: Transmission, or the Death Instinct in Institutional Discourse. Jean Guillaumin. Pp. 261-270.

(1983). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 52:488

Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLIII, 1979: Transmission, or the Death Instinct in Institutional Discourse. Jean Guillaumin. Pp. 261-270.

The subject of transmission today sets certain groups of analysts into opposition. They are suspicious that some masochistic aspects of this stem from the death instinct, and, given the disruptions associated with the question, they may be right. Guillaumin proposes to examine the psychic dimensions of the need to transmit. There is a hesitation to write about the patient's wish to become an analyst and even more hesitation to write about patients who have become members of one's institute. This hesitancy on the part of training analysts to publish on transmission would seem to run counter to an analytic orientation and derives perhaps from fear, even though there should be nothing special about training analyses. Guillaumin feels that the problem of transmission is linked to the identification of analysts with their institutes and is explicable as a group psychological phenomenon. Any group defines its identity by defining the criteria of admission to the group. The reproduction of the group, the maintenance of the group's identity, and the question of the essence of that group are closely related questions. Guillaumin's hypothesis is that there is a sort of collective unconscious involved in the wish to transmit. Many problems in recognizing individual motivations in transmissions come from this group identification, with resulting ambivalence and fantasies of fusion with the good mother. The analyst needs the skill and courage to look at his individual need for transmission, as well as his group identification. The desire to have a child, a pedagogical child, is an important element in transmission, but this also needs to be analyzed. This child, whom the analyst invests in as a future other self, requires that the analyst resolve the ambivalence of his own instinctual demands. Even the postulate that there must be analysis is a defense. If such a postulate is not or cannot be examined, it functions as an idealizing urge for reparative and projective mastery, related to anal ambivalence and to unexamined aspects of the analyst's relation to his own analyst. Sometimes it is his relationship to the institute which is unexamined. The institute's neutrality can also be a screen, whether the analyst declares that the process of transmission is untouchable or that he is against it. In either case, there is the risk that unconscious hatred and projective idealizations may be displaced onto the collective group instead of being analyzed as a personal unconscious aspect of the analyst.

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Article Citation

(1983). Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLIII, 1979. Psychoanal. Q., 52:488

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