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Bing, J.F. (1985). The Annual of Psychoanalysis. X, 1982: Psychoanalysis in Russia and the U.S.S.R.: 1908-1979. George H. Pollock. Pp. 267-279.. Psychoanal Q., 54:509.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Annual of Psychoanalysis. X, 1982: Psychoanalysis in Russia and the U.S.S.R.: 1908-1979. George H. Pollock. Pp. 267-279.

(1985). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 54:509

The Annual of Psychoanalysis. X, 1982: Psychoanalysis in Russia and the U.S.S.R.: 1908-1979. George H. Pollock. Pp. 267-279.

James F. Bing

Pollock's interest in the history of psychoanalysis in Russia was stimulated by his invitation to attend the First International Symposium of the Unconscious held in Tbilisi, Georgia, U.S.S.R., in October 1979. He notes the great degree of interest in the subject: there were fourteen hundred participants at the meeting, most of whom were not clinicians. His source of information was from H. Lobner from notes that were written by V. Levitin (a pseudonym) in a seventy-page handwritten manuscript called "The Sigmund Freud House Bulletin." Further information was garnered from Carotenuto's book. This article is replete with fascinating references to the favorable and unfavorable reception of psychoanalysis in the U.S.S.R. In 1893, Bekhterev was appointed Professor of Neurology at the Military-Medical Academy in St. Petersburg where he founded the Laboratory for Experimental Psychology. He pursued an interest in psychoanalysis and was noted for his hypnotic treatment of the man who later became known as Freud's Wolf Man. However, by 1924, Bekhterev had begun to attack psychoanalysis, thus marking the beginning of its end in Russia. A further factor in the demise of psychoanalysis was repudiation of Trotsky who had been very much interested in psychoanalytic theory. With his exile, psychoanalysis continued its steady decline, and by 1938, under Stalin's regime, it had been totally rejected. There is a possible recrudescence of interest in psychoanalysis in Russia at this time, but it is very rudimentary, and much time and many changes in the Soviet ideology will have to take place before anything substantial is developed in this area.

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Article Citation

Bing, J.F. (1985). The Annual of Psychoanalysis. X, 1982. Psychoanal. Q., 54:509

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