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Fishman, G.G. (1986). American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: A Jungian Critique of Harry Slochower's Paper. Jonathan J. Goldberg. Pp. 41-56.. Psychoanal Q., 55:194.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: A Jungian Critique of Harry Slochower's Paper. Jonathan J. Goldberg. Pp. 41-56.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:194

American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: A Jungian Critique of Harry Slochower's Paper. Jonathan J. Goldberg. Pp. 41-56.

George G. Fishman

Reviewing Slochower's paper1 on Jung's Answer to Job, Goldberg reminds us that interpretation is of the mind of the interpreter. In the Jungian view, the answer to Job is an exploration of transpersonal truths. When Jung dreams of a phallus in a temple, it is "the generative energy of the collective unconscious." Similarly, Job and Yahweh, Freud and Jung, explore the mythic boundaries of Father in relation to Son. Goldberg emphasizes that in his view what blocks a person is not conflict, but a stagnating set of premises. "Working through" is realizing new premises, i.e., that the son can seek himself, that God may have to be recreated by every individual, etc. His arguments have a cogent coherence except in reference to Jung's letter to Illing. Jung's casual generalizations about the Jews, even if taken as an exploration of collective symbols, bear a strong resemblance to prejudice, which always has its rationale.

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Article Citation

Fishman, G.G. (1986). American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981. Psychoanal. Q., 55:194

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.