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Fishman, G.G. (1986). American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: The Appeal of Star Wars: An Archetypal-Psychoanalytic View. Martin Miller and Robert Sprich. Pp. 203-220.. Psychoanal Q., 55:195.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: The Appeal of Star Wars: An Archetypal-Psychoanalytic View. Martin Miller and Robert Sprich. Pp. 203-220.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:195

American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: The Appeal of Star Wars: An Archetypal-Psychoanalytic View. Martin Miller and Robert Sprich. Pp. 203-220.

George G. Fishman

Contesting the mainstream critiques of Star Wars as being fluff in the service of commercialism, the authors argue instead for the film's attainment of many of the qualities of successful myth and fairy tale. The viewer is allowed to identify with an archetypal hero, Luke, who is attempting to resolve oedipal conflict. A diversity of themes and ideas are considered: the family romance suggested by Luke's adoption; the transcendence of Obi-wan; the negative oedipal relationship of R2D2 and C3PO; the Buddhist quality of the Force; the presence of a subliminal history of American film heroism, e.g., Hans Solo's resemblance to a Humphrey Bogart character. The analysis is warmly serious and successfully vindicates the appeal of this delightful film.


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Article Citation

Fishman, G.G. (1986). American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981. Psychoanal. Q., 55:195

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.