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Fishman, G.G. (1986). American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: On Aggression. The Psychological Fallout of Surface Nuclear Testing. Martin Wangh. Pp. 305-322.. Psychoanal Q., 55:195-196.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: On Aggression. The Psychological Fallout of Surface Nuclear Testing. Martin Wangh. Pp. 305-322.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:195-196

American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981: On Aggression. The Psychological Fallout of Surface Nuclear Testing. Martin Wangh. Pp. 305-322.

George G. Fishman

The author speculates on the psychological effects of widespread public exposure, in print and broadcast media, to images and facts concerning atomic explosions from 1945 to 1963. He calls on a variety of sources, from Sybil Escalona's extensive survey of children to Wangh's own more informal interviews with young adults and colleagues. In individual settings and group discussion, the "strontium 90 generation" admit that they live under a significant pall of nuclear anxiety. A feeling of "What is the use?" is always latently present. Wangh thus turns to the curious finding that despite the prevalence of anxiety over the potential holocaust, it is seldom raised in psychotherapy or analysis. Various reasons for this are discussed. Wangh speculates that affective consciousness of nuclear threat violates the


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foundations of a stable treatment situation, i.e., the ability to believe in a therapist who can contain and control chaos. He offers a clinical illustration. This paper is invaluable in at least broaching the problem of locating the many emotional hideouts of nuclear anxiety.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
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Article Citation

Fishman, G.G. (1986). American Imago. XXXVIII, 1981. Psychoanal. Q., 55:195-196

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.