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Hartman, J.J. (1986). Psychoanalytic Study of Society. X, 1984: A Case of "Brain-Fag" Syndrome: Psychotherapy of the Patient Adou A. in the Village of Yosso, Ivory Coast Republic. Paul Parin. Pp. 1-52.. Psychoanal Q., 55:197-197.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalytic Study of Society. X, 1984: A Case of "Brain-Fag" Syndrome: Psychotherapy of the Patient Adou A. in the Village of Yosso, Ivory Coast Republic. Paul Parin. Pp. 1-52.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:197-197

Psychoanalytic Study of Society. X, 1984: A Case of "Brain-Fag" Syndrome: Psychotherapy of the Patient Adou A. in the Village of Yosso, Ivory Coast Republic. Paul Parin. Pp. 1-52.

John J. Hartman

The term "brain-fag" syndrome describes a condition found among African students related to their inability to continue their studies. Previous work has explained this as due to cultural changes stemming from Europeanization. Western psychiatry has described this syndrome in terms of hysteria, depression, borderline syndrome, or identity conflict. Parin carefully describes a case of a young Anyi man from the Ivory Coast whom he effectively treated in eighteen sessions of psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy. The author uses this case not only to point up the inadequacy of previous attempts to explain this syndrome but also to demonstrate the effectiveness of the psychoanalytic model in understanding and treating this man. In particular, the author contends that a "negative" outcome to the oedipus complex made this young man vulnerable to neurosis when his encounter with a European-style education led to conflicts.


WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.
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Article Citation

Hartman, J.J. (1986). Psychoanalytic Study of Society. X, 1984. Psychoanal. Q., 55:197-197

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WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.