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Gray, S.H. (1986). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XLVII, 1983: Teaching and Learning Short Term Dynamic Psychotherapy. Meir Winokur and Haim Dasberg. Pp. 36-52.. Psychoanal Q., 55:200-201.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XLVII, 1983: Teaching and Learning Short Term Dynamic Psychotherapy. Meir Winokur and Haim Dasberg. Pp. 36-52.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:200-201

Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XLVII, 1983: Teaching and Learning Short Term Dynamic Psychotherapy. Meir Winokur and Haim Dasberg. Pp. 36-52.

Sheila Hafter Gray

The authors present a method of teaching a technique of brief dynamic psychotherapy through a seminar conducted in accordance with the technical and dynamic principles which characterize that therapeutic model: advance planning, a focused goal, and a time limit aimed at enhancing the motivation of the participants. Twelve sessions are recommended. In the first, a learning contract is established concerning reading assignments, classroom presentations, and time. The next four sessions are devoted to the study of the relevant literature on theory, case selection and evaluation, definition of focus, technique, and termination. During the middle phase, subgroups participate in the actual evaluation of a patient, and if brief psychotherapy is to be prescribed, the subgroup completes the diagnosis and formulation of the case, the definition of the focus, and the outlining of a treatment strategy. Their findings are then presented to the full group for discussion. After just a few such sessions, the authors find, students begin to experience feelings of both competence in and ambivalence toward this new treatment modality. The ambivalence generally takes the form of quasi-intellectual resistances, which are addressed, along with more overtly emotional resistance, as expressions of group dynamics. This format, the authors state, permits the instructor not only to impart objective information


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but also to deal with the students' resistances to this form of treatment. These take on special significance when the student therapists have had substantial experience with long-term treatment. There is no discussion of termination, nor is there any information on the long-range efficacy of the method.


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Article Citation

Gray, S.H. (1986). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic. XLVII, 1983. Psychoanal. Q., 55:200-201

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.