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Bing, J.F. (1986). The Annual of Psychoanalysis. XI, 1983: Psychoanalysis and the Two Cerebral Hemispheres. F. M. Levin and D. M Vuckovich. Pp. 171-197.. Psychoanal Q., 55:363-364.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Annual of Psychoanalysis. XI, 1983: Psychoanalysis and the Two Cerebral Hemispheres. F. M. Levin and D. M Vuckovich. Pp. 171-197.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:363-364

The Annual of Psychoanalysis. XI, 1983: Psychoanalysis and the Two Cerebral Hemispheres. F. M. Levin and D. M Vuckovich. Pp. 171-197.

James F. Bing

The authors hint that anatomical changes may actually result from analysis and discuss the possibility of relating analytic concepts to anatomy and neurology. They suggest that one hemisphere may not know what is happening in the other, which may be related to disavowal and repression. Repression is the blocking of the past


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
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from one hemisphere to the other. The authors discuss the evolutional significance of bicamerality. Civilization and meaning can become possible only after a certain degree of development of the brain's bicameral structure. According to Lashley, "a complex organization held together by interaction of processes has no distinguishing feature other than its organization," and the authors state that this is what they have been trying to show in their own words. They believe that analyzability is definitely related to the plasticity of the brain; the analyst, they suggest, functions effectively by linking the two hemispheres. Perhaps the authors' most useful contribution is the attempt to correlate neurological and psychoanalytic data, which may enable us to further understand personality structure.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
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Article Citation

Bing, J.F. (1986). The Annual of Psychoanalysis. XI, 1983. Psychoanal. Q., 55:363-364

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.