Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see translations of Freud SE or GW…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

When you hover your mouse over a paragraph of the Standard Edition (SE) long enough, the corresponding text from Gesammelte Werke slides from the bottom of the PEP-Web window, and vice versa.

If the slide up window bothers you, you can turn it off by checking the box “Turn off Translations” in the slide-up.  But if you’ve turned it off, how do you turn it back on?  The option to turn off the translations only is effective for the current session (it uses a stored cookie in your browser).  So the easiest way to turn it back on again is to close your browser (all open windows), and reopen it.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982: Preoedipal and Early Oedipal Components of the Superego. Robert D. Gillman. Pp. 273-281.. Psychoanal Q., 55:369-369.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982: Preoedipal and Early Oedipal Components of the Superego. Robert D. Gillman. Pp. 273-281.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:369-369

Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982: Preoedipal and Early Oedipal Components of the Superego. Robert D. Gillman. Pp. 273-281.

Gillman describes the superego, like the ego, as an organization of functions. Using Novey's concept of a "functional pattern of introjections" and Gould's "internal morality system," he views the superego in the late oedipal period as an internal and autonomous structure and regulator of behavior. The genesis and development of the superego and its functions are a "step-wise growth through identifications with innumerable bits and pieces of object experience." Aggression and restraint of instinct are related to 1) identification with the aggressor; 2) identification with the frustrator; 3) turning passive into active; 4) reaction formation; 5) turning aggression onto the self; 6) the inhibition of aggression. For loving and the beloved, Gillman lists identification with the comforter, with the provider, and with the protector. He gives examples, from the work of Spitz and Parens, of prohibitions and restraints seen in early precursors. Finally, he cites Gould's 1972 study of two groups of three- to five-year-old nursery school children: those showing predominantly primary identifications and others showing superego development. The first group was characterized by identifications with the aggressor, turning aggression onto the self, and acting out. They also showed evidence of delayed internalization, little empathy, little wish to please, global self-criticism, and decreased sublimation. The second group showed identifications with the comforter, protector, and provider. These children manifested a wish to please, increased internalization, sublimation, and empathic response, and limited self-criticism.


WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.
- 369 -

Article Citation

(1986). Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982. Psychoanal. Q., 55:369-369

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.