Login
(1986). Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982: A New Look at Fathers. Colette Chiland. Pp. 367-379.. Psychoanal Q., 55:370.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982: A New Look at Fathers. Colette Chiland. Pp. 367-379.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:370

Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982: A New Look at Fathers. Colette Chiland. Pp. 367-379.

Chiland cites Dorothy Burlingham's 1973 article, "The Preoedipal Infant-Father Relationship," which describes the stimulating function of the father; the father is seen as the punishing and inhibiting figure as well as the protective one. Lacan sees the father as protector of the child as he pulls it away from the mother's desire, "which would otherwise reduce the child to being her phallus." Chiland points to changes in the last ten years in which fathers have become more involved as the caretakers of infants. But what is the father's function? She concludes that there are particular, rather than general function; that is, the functions of a particular father and mother, their relationship, and the father's role, presence, or absence. She outlines the recent discoveries of infants' capacity to imitate, to respond to human language, to discriminate smells, to respond to heartbeats and in general to search for and discover the mother. All this raises questions about the "normal autistic" aspect of infancy and also about the role of the father in this period, since he does not possess attributes that the infant responds to preferentially and innately, such as the smell of colostrum, high-pitched sounds, or the breast. Fathers who are nurturant as well as "dominant" and involved with the child predispose to "masculine" sons. But many questions remain about persons who were raised predominantly by fathers. The different effects of the father on boys and girls also remain uncertain.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
- 370 -

Article Citation

(1986). Psychoanalytic Study of Child. XXXVII, 1982. Psychoanal. Q., 55:370

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.