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Storm, J.E. (1986). British Journal of Medical Psychology. LVII, 1984: Mourning Distinct from Melancholia: The Resolution of Bereavement. Simon S. Rubin. Pp. 339-345.. Psychoanal Q., 55:552.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: British Journal of Medical Psychology. LVII, 1984: Mourning Distinct from Melancholia: The Resolution of Bereavement. Simon S. Rubin. Pp. 339-345.

(1986). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 55:552

British Journal of Medical Psychology. LVII, 1984: Mourning Distinct from Melancholia: The Resolution of Bereavement. Simon S. Rubin. Pp. 339-345.

James E. Storm

The bereaved maintains a recollected and remembered relationship with the deceased, which changes during the process of bereavement. During the initial period, symptoms of these changes, such as protest and despair, may be observed. However, during the later stages of bereavement, which may last for years, there are frequently no symptoms, even though the intrapsychic relationship of the bereaved with the deceased is ongoing and continues to be actively revised. This may be thought of as an epilogue to mourning. Eventually the relationship of the bereaved to the deceased may become stabilized, and the bereaved neither overidealizes, denigrates, nor devalues the deceased. At this point, resolution of bereavement is asserted to have occurred. Two clinical examples illustrate the author's contention that examination of the ongoing relationship of the bereaved with the deceased will allow assessment of the degree of resolution of bereavement.


WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.
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Article Citation

Storm, J.E. (1986). British Journal of Medical Psychology. LVII, 1984. Psychoanal. Q., 55:552

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WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.