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Wilson, E., Jr. (1989). Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVII, 1983: Narcissus and Anubis. Béla Grunberger. Pp. 921-938.. Psychoanal Q., 58:321.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVII, 1983: Narcissus and Anubis. Béla Grunberger. Pp. 921-938.

(1989). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 58:321

Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVII, 1983: Narcissus and Anubis. Béla Grunberger. Pp. 921-938.

Emmett Wilson, Jr.

Grunberger argues for a primitive narcissism, or paleonarcissism, and an archaic aggression, both of which are qualitatively different from the narcissism and aggression that are factors in the structuralization of the ego. The source of the paleonarcissism is prenatal—in the cells of the fetus with their accelerated proliferation and expansion. In addition, a parasitical orality is the source of the fetus's basic violent aspects. These two factors have a purely somatic basis. They may be invoked in analysis as nontransference aspects of the process. There is, for Grunberger, an original bipolar coenesthesia, resulting from the interdependence of these archaic tendencies. They appear as phylogenetic imagoes capable of evoking profound malaise in those individuals who must deal with these aspects of the unconscious. They appear as the Sphinx, as sorcerer, as the Medusa, the Gorgon, the succubus, the nightmare, and so on, structured exclusively as maternal imagoes. The author relates this hypothesis to Cocteau's play, The Infernal Machine. In this play the sphinx is replaced by a young and beautiful woman accompanied by the jackal god, Anubis, the Egyptian god of death. Grunberger claims these represent the two primitive instincts. He presents case material to corroborate his thesis.

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Article Citation

Wilson, E., Jr. (1989). Revue Française De Psychanalyse. XLVII, 1983. Psychoanal. Q., 58:321

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