Login
Naiman, J. (1992). Le Coeur Et La Raison—L'hypnose En Question De Lavoisier À Lacan. (The Heart and Reason—The Question of Hypnosis from Lavoisier to Lacan.): By L. Chertok and I. Stengers. Paris: Payot, 1989. 289 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 61:122-123.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61:122-123

Le Coeur Et La Raison—L'hypnose En Question De Lavoisier À Lacan. (The Heart and Reason—The Question of Hypnosis from Lavoisier to Lacan.): By L. Chertok and I. Stengers. Paris: Payot, 1989. 289 pp.

James Naiman Author Information

The title of this book was probably inspired by Pascal (Pensées 4, 267): "Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connaît point" ("The heart has its reasons of which reason knows nothing").

In 1784, Lavoisier dismissed hypnosis because it did not meet his criteria for science. The thesis presented by Chertok and Stengers is that Freud's wish for scientific respectability led him to create the psychoanalytic situation. With its emphasis on abstinence, neutrality, and the transference neurosis, psychoanalysis gave priority to reason over the dictates of the heart.

The result, according to the authors, had limited therapeutic effectiveness, as first noticed by Ferenczi, who believed that analysts

- 122 -

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.