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Bick, I. (1992). Psychiatry and the Cinema: By Krin Gabbard and Glen O. Gabbard. Chicago/London: The University of Chicago Press, 1987. 304 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 61:304-308.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61:304-308

Psychiatry and the Cinema: By Krin Gabbard and Glen O. Gabbard. Chicago/London: The University of Chicago Press, 1987. 304 pp.

Review by:
Ilsa Bick

In Jonathan Demme's 1991 thriller, The Silence of the Lambs, two psychiatrists figure prominently in the plot's action. Dr. Childrun, the sadistic director of a forensic hospital, is depicted as obnoxiously arrogant, insecure, and slimly, ambiguously sexual as he attempts to dominate the young heroine, Clarice Starling. Far from being an empathetic physician or even a competent doctor (only in the novel is it explained that he is not a physician or psychologist), Dr. Childrun is the quintessence of ruthless and vengeful ambition as he tortures his psychiatric patients by depriving them of their

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