Login
Gonchar, J. (1992). Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XIII, 1990: Brain-Centered Psychology: A Semiotic Approach. David D. Olds. Pp. 331-363.. Psychoanal Q., 61:318-319.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XIII, 1990: Brain-Centered Psychology: A Semiotic Approach. David D. Olds. Pp. 331-363.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61:318-319

Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XIII, 1990: Brain-Centered Psychology: A Semiotic Approach. David D. Olds. Pp. 331-363.

Joel Gonchar

The author suggests that with the proliferation of information from neuroscience, we are at the point at which we can begin to develop a psychology which is braincentered, and which would also be at the same level of abstraction as ego psychology. This new psychology would function as an addendum to ego psychology and would


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
- 318 -

help explain the areas (including affect theory and the organic aspects of brain function) in which ego psychology is weak. It would also explain the efficacy of certain treatment modalities, such as biochemical manipulation, behavior therapy, biofeedback, or gestalt techniques. The author believes that with the aid of information theory, neurobiology and psychoanalysis can be linked. He defines information and then shows how brain events, when looked at as informational, can also be seen as a description of mind. He demonstrates how semiotics or the study of signs is similar and parallel to information theory. The latter theory deals more with quantitative, while the former more with qualitative, aspects of information. Using the information-semiotic theory, Olds outlines four kinds of learning that take place in different parts of the brain: affective, behavioral, internalizing, and cognitive. Each mode of therapy in use today can be shown to relate to one of these types of learning.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
- 319 -

Article Citation

Gonchar, J. (1992). Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. XIII, 1990. Psychoanal. Q., 61:318-319

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.