Login
Gilmore, K. (1992). The Significance of Infant Observational Research for Clinical Work with Children, Adolescents, and Adults. (Workshop Series of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Monograph 5.): Edited by Scott Dowling, M.D. and Arnold Rothstein, M.D. Madison, CT: International Universities Press, Inc., 1989. 257 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 61:465-469.

Welcome to PEP Web!

Viewing the full text of this document requires a subscription to PEP Web.

If you are coming in from a university from a registered IP address or secure referral page you should not need to log in. Contact your university librarian in the event of problems.

If you have a personal subscription on your own account or through a Society or Institute please put your username and password in the box below. Any difficulties should be reported to your group administrator.

Username:
Password:

Can't remember your username and/or password? If you have forgotten your username and/or password please click here and log in to the PaDS database. Once there you need to fill in your email address (this must be the email address that PEP has on record for you) and click "Send." Your username and password will be sent to this email address within a few minutes. If this does not work for you please contact your group organizer.

Athens or federation user? Login here.

Not already a subscriber? Order a subscription today.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61:465-469

The Significance of Infant Observational Research for Clinical Work with Children, Adolescents, and Adults. (Workshop Series of the American Psychoanalytic Association, Monograph 5.): Edited by Scott Dowling, M.D. and Arnold Rothstein, M.D. Madison, CT: International Universities Press, Inc., 1989. 257 pp.

Karen Gilmore Author Information

This timely monograph brings together a variety of opinions on a topic that infiltrates much of the current literature, either directly or by implication. Discussions about the meaning of psychoanalytic process, the role of developmental psychology within psychoanalytic theory, the nature of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis, the integration of self psychology and the conflict model, the interface of psychoanalysis and neurobiology, indeed, the very domain of the discipline, commonly include references to new knowledge of infancy and its impact on the way we think about human psychology. Remarkably, such discussions often appear to rest on the question of whether information about real infants holds any scientific interest for psychoanalysts, with lines drawn between the object relations/self psychology school (yes) and the conflict/compromise formation school (no).

For the burgeoning field of infant psychiatry to become allied with a particular theoretical viewpoint would be unfortunate in the extreme, despite the inevitable fact that much of the research is informed by the particular persuasion of the investigators. Many of these and related issues are addressed in this collection of papers, helping to orient the reader in what may often seem like the hostile crossfire of a heated polemic.

The Workshop Series format is well suited to the task, with the Workshop papers sandwiched between a historical review and five discussion papers. Phyllis Tyson's review confronts the "contention" in the field; she understands its origins in the two broadly defined avenues of approach to infancy within psychoanalysis, the clinical/naturalistic observational approach and the academic/laboratory research approach. She points out the potential for dialogue and mutual enrichment. She introduces her paper with a reference to Sir James Barrie's Peter Pan, the infant who escapes from humanity into the world of fairies at seven days of age and

- 465 -

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2014, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing. Help | About | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Problem

WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.