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Grossman, L. (1992). Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991: Experiential Psychoanalysis and the Engagement of Selves: Ferenczi's Vision and the Psychoanalytic Present. I. S. Miller. Pp. 67-83.. Psychoanal Q., 61:505-505.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991: Experiential Psychoanalysis and the Engagement of Selves: Ferenczi's Vision and the Psychoanalytic Present. I. S. Miller. Pp. 67-83.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61:505-505

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991: Experiential Psychoanalysis and the Engagement of Selves: Ferenczi's Vision and the Psychoanalytic Present. I. S. Miller. Pp. 67-83.

Lee Grossman

Miller describes the evolution of Ferenczi's experiential psychoanalysis, and briefly notes his influence on modern analysts. Miller views the classical tradition as using the idea of neutrality to sidestep the issue of the analyst's subjective participation, and the Sullivanian tradition as using objectivity and the privacy of experience toward the same end. Neither recognizes the importance of the subjectively felt experience of interrelatedness. Ferenczi focused on the affective quality of the engagement for each participant. He reflected on his own participation in the process. Gill, Levenson, Racker, Sandler, and Searles follow his lead in seeing the analyst's participation as "a real response within a genuine transferential-countertransferential enactment." Transference was not simply a repetition of the past, but a directly enacted present experience.


WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.
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Article Citation

Grossman, L. (1992). Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991. Psychoanal. Q., 61:505-505

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WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.