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Grossman, L. (1992). Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991: The Role of the Transference in the Wolf Man Case. H. L. Muslin. Pp. 294-306.. Psychoanal Q., 61:506-507.

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Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991: The Role of the Transference in the Wolf Man Case. H. L. Muslin. Pp. 294-306.

(1992). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 61:506-507

Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991: The Role of the Transference in the Wolf Man Case. H. L. Muslin. Pp. 294-306.

Lee Grossman

Muslin looks at the Wolf Man case in order to spell out Freud's 1914 view of the curative factors in analysis, especially with respect to the role of the transference. He describes how Freud used the transference attachment (i.e., the threat of termination) to facilitate recall of memories. Memory retrieval and reconstruction, rather than awareness and resolution of the transference neurosis, were seen as curative. Muslin cites several extracts from Freud's description which show his apparent use of transference leverage without exploration, or outright neglect of the transference. In Brunswick's re-analysis, the unresolved masochistic transference to Freud was noted, but the new treatment also neglected awareness of the transference, examples of which were abundant. Muslin suggests that Brunswick's "attack" on the Wolf Man's favorite son posture with respect to Freud was experienced as similar to


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
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Freud's command to terminate. This allowed a transference cure by re-establishing the passive masochistic position that gave him peace. Muslin concludes that Freud's 1914 view of the role of the transference was that it was leverage to facilitate the recall of childhood memories and reconstruction.


WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the PEPWeb subscriber and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form.
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Article Citation

Grossman, L. (1992). Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis. XIX, 1991. Psychoanal. Q., 61:506-507

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WARNING! This text is printed for the personal use of the subscriber to PEP Web and is copyright to the Journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to copy, distribute or circulate it in any form whatsoever.