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Hartman, J.J. (1993). The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XV, 1990: Australian Aborigines: The Yolgnu, the Pitjatjatjara and "Dark People" of Bourke: An Ethnographic and Rorschach Study. Ruth M. Boyer, et al. Pp. 271-310.. Psychoanal Q., 62:693.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XV, 1990: Australian Aborigines: The Yolgnu, the Pitjatjatjara and "Dark People" of Bourke: An Ethnographic and Rorschach Study. Ruth M. Boyer, et al. Pp. 271-310.

(1993). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 62:693

The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XV, 1990: Australian Aborigines: The Yolgnu, the Pitjatjatjara and "Dark People" of Bourke: An Ethnographic and Rorschach Study. Ruth M. Boyer, et al. Pp. 271-310.

John J. Hartman

The authors present an ethnographic and Rorschach study of three societies of Australian aborigines which differed in their degree of deculturation and acculturation. The Yolgnu were the least acculturated group: they continued to believe in the religion of the Dreamtime extensively studied by Róheim and many others. The Pitjatjatjara had more contact with white culture but retained many of the beliefs of the Dreamtime. The "Dark People" of Bourke, all of whom were half-caste descendants of survivors of a 1915 massacre by whites, retained little of the ancient culture. Rorschach tests were administered to males and females, aged 17 to 60 +. The protocols were scored on Exner's Comprehensive System, but statistical comparison was not possible because of the low number of responses. However, an Affective Inferences Scoring System was used instead and proved valuable. Statistical differences in degree of emotion, types of anxiety, depression, and hostility were found between the groups, genders, and ages. The differences were correlated to the degree of acculturation, with greater acculturation leading to greater anxiety, less emotionality, and fewer references to religion. Women and people over 40 tended to be less acculturated. The authors endorse the use of the Roschach as an anthropological tool.

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Article Citation

Hartman, J.J. (1993). The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XV, 1990. Psychoanal. Q., 62:693

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