Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To sort articles by Rank…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can specify Rank as the sort order when searching (it’s the default) which will put the articles which best matched your search on the top, and the complete results in descending relevance to your search.    This feature is useful for finding the most important articles on a specific topic.

You can also change the sort order of results by selecting rank at the top of the search results pane after you perform a search.  Note that rank order after a search only ranks up to 1000 maximum results that were returned; specifying rank in the search dialog ranks all possibilities before choosing the final 1000 (or less) to return.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Wangh, M. (1994). Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992: Can Psychoanalytic Insights Reveal the Knowability and the Aesthetics of the Holocaust? Moshe Halevi Spero. Pp. 123-170.. Psychoanal Q., 63:613.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992: Can Psychoanalytic Insights Reveal the Knowability and the Aesthetics of the Holocaust? Moshe Halevi Spero. Pp. 123-170.

(1994). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 63:613

Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992: Can Psychoanalytic Insights Reveal the Knowability and the Aesthetics of the Holocaust? Moshe Halevi Spero. Pp. 123-170.

Martin Wangh

This paper analyzes the contention that the Holocaust is unknowable, and also the notion that psychoanalytic interpretations of the Holocaust and its metaphors contrast with "aesthetic" presentations and are therefore in some way undesirable. Five possible modes of "knowing" the Holocaust are differentiated, leading to the conclusion that the Holocaust is in fact knowable, or at least subject to being known. Nevertheless, we find that the profound silences, absences, and psychospatial gaps that continue to be transmitted unconsciously across the generations tend to perpetuate certain "unknowable" aspects of the Holocaust experience. Second, the myth of the psychological unknowability of the Holocaust may mask the more profoundly disturbing theological dilemma of God's apparent relinquishing of the world to human evil. Linking concepts are provided for bridging the philosophical and clinical dimensions of the discussion.

—————————————

The following abstract appeared in this issue of Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel, and is reprinted with the kind permission of the author, Moshe Halevi Spero.


WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.
- 613 -

Article Citation

Wangh, M. (1994). Journal of Social Work and Policy in Israel. V-Vi (Special Issue), 1992. Psychoanal. Q., 63:613

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.