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Dunn, J. (1994). The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. I, 1993. The Psychoanalytic Society and the Analyst, with Special Reference to the History of the Dutch Psychoanalytical Society 1917-1947. Han Groen-Prakken. Pp. 13-37.. Psychoanal Q., 63:813.
   
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. I, 1993. The Psychoanalytic Society and the Analyst, with Special Reference to the History of the Dutch Psychoanalytical Society 1917-1947. Han Groen-Prakken. Pp. 13-37.

(1994). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 63:813

The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. I, 1993. The Psychoanalytic Society and the Analyst, with Special Reference to the History of the Dutch Psychoanalytical Society 1917-1947. Han Groen-Prakken. Pp. 13-37.

Jonathan Dunn

The problems in the development of the Dutch Psychoanalytical Society were the same problems inherent in all psychoanalytic organizations starting with Freud. Scientific controversies often mask the psychopathology and personal incompatibilities that more profoundly "split" psychoanalytic groups and institutes: conflicts related to envy, idealization, competition, power, etc. Groen-Prakken's chronicle highlights the Freud-Jung schism because many of the Dutch psychoanalytic pioneers were analyzed and trained by Jung. She also discusses the anti-Semitic attitudes of the early Dutch psychoanalysts toward their European counterparts who immigrated to the Netherlands during the Nazi regime; these more experienced analysts had a disorganizing effect on the smaller, less sophisticated, and perhaps more insecure Dutch group. Where the three main founding factions of psychoanalysis in Holland ("straight Freudians," university-affiliated psychiatrists who were seeking nonbiological theories of mental illness, and the Jungian-oriented group) stood on the issue of lay analysis, and how they dealt with this controversy, is also reviewed.

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Article Citation

Dunn, J. (1994). The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. I, 1993.. Psychoanal. Q., 63:813

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