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Hartman, J.J. (1995). The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XVI, 1991. The Self and Kagwahiv Dream Beliefs. Waud Kracke. Pp. 43-53.. Psychoanal Q., 64:206.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XVI, 1991. The Self and Kagwahiv Dream Beliefs. Waud Kracke. Pp. 43-53.

(1995). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 64:206

The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XVI, 1991. The Self and Kagwahiv Dream Beliefs. Waud Kracke. Pp. 43-53.

John J. Hartman

Hallowell used the notion of self as a central concept in his explanation of the relationship between personality and culture. Using modern psychoanalytic concepts of the self, Kracke explores the beliefs of the Kagwahiv of South America about their dreams. He found that they have four distinct theories. A dream can be a mental process that transforms a waking train of thought to a representation of a wish fulfilled, a communication about the incipient future, a perception of dangerous spirits, or an emotional communication from others. The author contends that dreams constitute a striking example of differences in the conceptualization of the self in relation to its behavioral environment.

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Article Citation

Hartman, J.J. (1995). The Psychoanalytic Study of Society. XVI, 1991.. Psychoanal. Q., 64:206

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