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Dunn, J. (1997). The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. II, 1995-1996. Am I My Brother's Keeper? On the Partners of Persons Who Were in Hiding During the Occupation. Hendrika C. Halberstadt-Freud. Pp. 126-137.. Psychoanal Q., 66:366-367.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. II, 1995-1996. Am I My Brother's Keeper? On the Partners of Persons Who Were in Hiding During the Occupation. Hendrika C. Halberstadt-Freud. Pp. 126-137.

(1997). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 66:366-367

The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. II, 1995-1996. Am I My Brother's Keeper? On the Partners of Persons Who Were in Hiding During the Occupation. Hendrika C. Halberstadt-Freud. Pp. 126-137.

Jonathan Dunn

The author discusses her impressions of the psychodynamic makeups of non- Jewish wives of men who as children were in hiding during the Nazi occupation. The wife may have unconscious needs to make reparation and to rescue; falling out of love, leaving their husbands, or failing to make them happy for whatever reasons may carry an extra burden of guilt for these women. Masochistic enactment, in which the wife's suffering can never equal that of her husband's, may make any acknowledgment of her aggression extremely difficult—all she is permitted to do is comfort and serve, even if this means being an object into which he may project his rage, guilt, fear, misery, blame, regressive longings, etc. Other difficult issues in these relationships include: 1) the “foster-child” husband always feeling unaccepted, thus arousing the wife's insecurity; 2) the husband's entrenched sense of obligation and gratitude to those protecting him by “taking him in”; 3) the husband's entrenched passivity or constant activity from tremendous fear of being passively overtaken; 4) inflexibility in dealing with the natural changes of life; 5) the husband's shifts from autonomy and pride to dependency and humiliation; 6) lack of self-worth and depression; and 7) deep-seated rage which comes out only at home—a sense of exceptional entitlement to reparation from his family. The author also discusses the effects of hiding on the man's fathering capacities and on his offspring. One possible pitfall for the wife is that her husband will eventually find prideful freedom and pleasure in regaining his

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Jewish identity, while she feels alone and exploited because he no longer needs her as he did.

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Article Citation

Dunn, J. (1997). The Dutch Annual of Psychoanalysis. II, 1995-1996.. Psychoanal. Q., 66:366-367

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