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Tip: To use Pocket to save bookmarks to PEP-Web articles…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Pocket (formerly “Read-it-later”) is an excellent third-party plugin to browsers for saving bookmarks to PEP-Web pages, and categorizing them with tags.

To save a bookmark to a PEP-Web Article:

  • Use the plugin to “Save to Pocket”
  • The article referential information is stored in Pocket, but not the content. Basically, it is a Bookmark only system.
  • You can add tags to categorize the bookmark to the article or book section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Hartman, J.J. (1997). Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences. XXXI, 1995. “The Tempest in My Mind”: Cultural Interfaces between Psychiatry and Literature, 1844-1900. Susanna L. Blumenthal. Pp. 3-34.. Psychoanal Q., 66:560.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences. XXXI, 1995. “The Tempest in My Mind”: Cultural Interfaces between Psychiatry and Literature, 1844-1900. Susanna L. Blumenthal. Pp. 3-34.

(1997). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 66:560

Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences. XXXI, 1995. “The Tempest in My Mind”: Cultural Interfaces between Psychiatry and Literature, 1844-1900. Susanna L. Blumenthal. Pp. 3-34.

John J. Hartman

This paper traces the linkages between psychiatry and literature in the professional publications of the first generation of American psychiatrists. The author surveys the issues of the American Journal of Insanity from 1844 to 1870. This work is replete with passages from Shakespeare, Byron, Scott, and many other English poets and prose writers. There were several uses to which these early psychiatrists put this linkage. First, they sought to equate the writing and enjoyment of poetry with “unsoundness of mind.” This meant that poets possessed both a form of insanity as well as a special insight into the nature of mental illness. Poets and writers were therefore quoted as authorities on mental illness, and their characters, such as Hamlet and Lear, were treated as if they were actual case histories. Finally, the artistic and poetic productions of the mentally ill in asylums were deemed a particularly rich source of information about the nature and causes of insanity.

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Article Citation

Hartman, J.J. (1997). Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences. XXXI, 1995.. Psychoanal. Q., 66:560

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