Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To access PEP-Web support…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

If you click on the banner at the top of the website, you will be brought to the page for PEP-Web support.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Layton, L. (1998). Toward a Model of Self-Identity: Habermas and Kristeva: Allison Weir. In Feminists Read Habermas, ed. Johanna Meehan. New York: Routledge, 1995. Pp. 263-282. Psychoanal Q., 67(2):342.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Toward a Model of Self-Identity: Habermas and Kristeva: Allison Weir. In Feminists Read Habermas, ed. Johanna Meehan. New York: Routledge, 1995. Pp. 263-282

(1998). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 67(2):342

Toward a Model of Self-Identity: Habermas and Kristeva: Allison Weir. In Feminists Read Habermas, ed. Johanna Meehan. New York: Routledge, 1995. Pp. 263-282

Lynne Layton

This essay would have been appropriate as the last chapter of Sacrificial Logics, since Weir sketches her theory of social self-identity more clearly here than in the book. The criticism of Benjamin and Butler is reiterated. It is evident that Weir's central concern is how one develops a capacity for critique. Her model proposes that we do not internalize one conventional and agreed-upon set of norms but rather conflicting norms taken in via the variety of our relationships. From the conflict among these norms comes a capacity to abstract from the particular relationships, to be critical of norms, and to appeal to principles: “The child is forced to individuate through taking positions with respect to given conflicts.” Drawing on Mead and Habermas, Weir makes the claim that the learning and use of language guarantee intersubjectivity. Drawing on Kristeva, she argues that love is the motivation for investing in a world of shared meanings rather than only personal meanings. Again, Weir's model of self-identity offers important insights about the sociality of the self, but clinicians may find that her model displays a certain naïveté about how difficult the path to the development of intersubjectivity can be.

- 342 -

Article Citation

Layton, L. (1998). Toward a Model of Self-Identity: Habermas and Kristeva. Psychoanal. Q., 67(2):342

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.