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PEP-Easy Tip: To save PEP-Easy to the home screen

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To start PEP-Easy without first opening your browser–just as you would start a mobile app, you can save a shortcut to your home screen.

First, in Chrome or Safari, depending on your platform, open PEP-Easy from pepeasy.pep-web.org. You want to be on the default start screen, so you have a clean workspace.

Then, depending on your mobile device…follow the instructions below:

On IOS:

  1. Tap on the share icon Action navigation bar and tab bar icon
  2. In the bottom list, tap on ‘Add to home screen’
  3. In the “Add to Home” confirmation “bubble”, tap “Add”

On Android:

  1. Tap on the Chrome menu (Vertical Ellipses)
  2. Select “Add to Home Screen” from the menu

 

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Cavell, M. (1998). Working through the Nazi Past: Germany's Psychoanalytic Community. A Distant View from Close Quarters. Martin Wangh. Pp. 97-122. Psychoanal Q., 67(3):532-533.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Working through the Nazi Past: Germany's Psychoanalytic Community. A Distant View from Close Quarters. Martin Wangh. Pp. 97-122

(1998). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 67(3):532-533

Working through the Nazi Past: Germany's Psychoanalytic Community. A Distant View from Close Quarters. Martin Wangh. Pp. 97-122

Marcica Cavell

Taking both a personal and a general perspective, the author sketches the sociohistorical circumstances leading to the destruction of psychoanalysis in Germany between 1933 and 1945. In so doing he looks at the attitudes and responses evinced by those “Aryan” analysts who believed it to be possible to “rescue” psychoanalysis from Hitler's grasp without forfeiting any of its central convictions.

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Then Wangh takes Alexander and Margarete Mitscherlich's pioneering work, The Inability to Mourn, as a starting point for a reconstruction of the revolt staged in the late seventies and early eighties by the younger generation against their analytic parents and their continuing silence about the past—a revolt that took place not least in the pages of Psyche. Central to Wangh's remarks is a concern with the working out of persistent feelings of shame, guilt, and success (or failure) in the attempt to overcome and/or integrate them. Finally, the author advances a suggestion as to how the emotional—and verbal—barriers between the descendants of the victims and those of the perpetrators could be removed.

- 533 -

Article Citation

Cavell, M. (1998). Working through the Nazi Past: Germany's Psychoanalytic Community. A Distant View from Close Quarters. Martin Wangh.. Psychoanal. Q., 67(3):532-533

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