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(2007). Volume XIV, Number 2, 2006.: Towards Clarity in the Concept of Projective Identification: A Review and a Proposal (Part 2): Clinical Examples of Definitional Confusion. Ely Garfinkle, pp. 159-173.. Psychoanal Q., 76(4):1407-1408.
Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing: Volume XIV, Number 2, 2006.: Towards Clarity in the Concept of Projective Identification: A Review and a Proposal (Part 2): Clinical Examples of Definitional Confusion. Ely Garfinkle, pp. 159-173.

(2007). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 76(4):1407-1408

Volume XIV, Number 2, 2006.: Towards Clarity in the Concept of Projective Identification: A Review and a Proposal (Part 2): Clinical Examples of Definitional Confusion. Ely Garfinkle, pp. 159-173.

This is the second of a two-part article on projective identification, which the author defines as “an unconscious phantasy in which split-off parts of the self are disowned, projected, and attributed to someone else,” with the unconscious intent to “control and/or influence the thinking, feeling, and/or action of the object” (p. 159). The author purposefully excludes any interpersonal or countertransferential aspects from this definition, reasoning that whether and how much the object experiences the pressure of the projection in part depends on the object. This view privileges the unconscious intent of the projector, which the analyst can discern “based on clinical evidence” (p. 159).

In the first part of this article, which appeared in Volume XIII, Number 2 (2005), the author provided a detailed history of the use of the term projective identification and a persuasive argument for the author's definition of the term. Here in the second part of the article, the author uses two clinical vignettes to show how the


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above definition differs from others currently in use and how this definition could help avoid the current “Tower of Babel” (p. 171) regarding the use of the term.


WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.
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Article Citation

(2007). Volume XIV, Number 2, 2006.. Psychoanal. Q., 76(4):1407-1408

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WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.