Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To see statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Statistics of the Most Popular Journal Articles on PEP-Web can be reviewed at any time. Just click the “See full statistics” link located at the end of the Most Popular Journal Articles list in the PEP Section.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Reppen, J. (2013). The Second Century of Psychoanalysis: Evolving Perspectives on Psychoanalytic Action. Edited by Michael J. Diamond and Christopher Christian. London: Karnac, 2011. 362 pp.. Psychoanal Q., 82(2):518-524.

(2013). Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 82(2):518-524

The Second Century of Psychoanalysis: Evolving Perspectives on Psychoanalytic Action. Edited by Michael J. Diamond and Christopher Christian. London: Karnac, 2011. 362 pp.

Review by:
Joseph Reppen

The catchy title of this book is somewhat misleading! It is more about therapeutic action. The volume is a fine, edited collection of papers about that subject and contains comparatively little about the second century of psychoanalysis (which, after all, has only recently begun). The book leads one to wonder what psychoanalysis would be like eighty years from now. It can also be read as an addendum to a fine collection of papers in The Psychoanalytic Quarterly's 2007 supplement on “Comparing Theories of Therapeutic Action,” edited by Sander Abend.

This is the fourth book in the CIPS (Confederation of Independent Psychoanalytic Societies) “Series on the Boundaries of Psychoanalysis.” I am familiar with the first three books in the series and can attest to their quality as well. (CIPS members consist of those societies that enjoy International Psychoanalytical Association membership following the now-famous lawsuit brought against the IPA and the American Psychoanalytic Association.) With the exception of Leo Rangell, all the contributors to The Second Century of Psychoanalysis are psychologists who are affiliated with the Los Angeles Institute and Society for Psychoanalytic Studies.

In the book's preface, Fredric Perlman poses the question of which is more curative: the relationship between patient and analyst, or insights gained through interpretation. He states that ongoing debates have shed more heat than light on the issue, leading to either/or positions (pseudo dichotomies), instead of recognizing the complex and inseparable interaction between these two factors.

- 518 -

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2017, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.