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Apprey, M. (1990). The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, Volume 43 edited by Albert J. Solnit, Peter B. Neubauer, Samuel Abrams, and Scott A. Dowling New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1988, vii + 461 pp., $50.00. Psa. Books, 1(3):285-298.

(1990). Psychoanalytic Books, 1(3):285-298

The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, Volume 43 edited by Albert J. Solnit, Peter B. Neubauer, Samuel Abrams, and Scott A. Dowling New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1988, vii + 461 pp., $50.00

Review by:
Maurice Apprey, Ph.D.

For thinkers and clinical practitioners whose conceptual filiation is psychoanalysis, The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child is an annual that needs no introduction. This annual has a long tradition of excellence that is maintained whether the category of psychoanalytic thinking under discussion is theory building, application of theory to the complexities of psychopathology, application of theory to technical considerations, the explication of psychoanalysis as a coherent theory of human development, or the application of some psychoanalytic thought to the understanding of culture, art, and humanities.

This 43rd volume is no exception to the exemplary standard set by previous volumes. Accordingly, Grubrich-Simitis and Kanzer lead off with two papers that contextualize aspects of the history of psychoanalysis. Kanzer breaks from the traditional psychoanalytic assumption that Freud's “Interpretation of Dreams” was ignored or rejected by his earliest reviewers. Instead, Kanzer surmises, along with later reviewers, that Freud's assessment of his book's reception was contaminated by his own psychological issues, which included the work of mourning over his father's death and superego injunctions that militated against surpassing his father. Thus, Freud's personal issues kept him from seeing the early reviews of his “Interpretation of Dreams” as part of an ongoing intellectual dialogue.

Whereas Kanzer examines those unconscious factors that were implicated in Freud's restricted view of his reception, Grubrich-Simitis writes on Freud's “A Phylogenetic Fantasy,” which is a metapsychological paper recently discovered among Ferenczi's literary estate.

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