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Sarner, C. (1990). The Teaching and Learning of Psychoanalysis Selected Papers of Joan Fleming edited by Stanley S. Weiss the Guilford Psychoanalysis Series. New York: Guilford, 1987, xxiv + 216 pp., $25.00. Psa. Books, 1(4):524-526.

(1990). Psychoanalytic Books, 1(4):524-526

The Teaching and Learning of Psychoanalysis Selected Papers of Joan Fleming edited by Stanley S. Weiss the Guilford Psychoanalysis Series. New York: Guilford, 1987, xxiv + 216 pp., $25.00

Review by:
Charles Sarner, M.D.

For those who are curious about psychoanalytic education and its historical development, this book provides an excellent introduction. Joan Fleming, who died in 1980, was for many years a consummate psychoanalytic educator as well as a fine clinician. She was intensely involved in a variety of committees and groups within the American Psychoanalytic Association, in addition to being an inspiring teacher at the Chicago and Denver institutes. Her colleague of many years, Stanley S. Weiss, has edited this volume, provided excellent prologue, epilogue, and introductory notes, and is coauthor of four of the nine papers. A foreword by Robert S. Wallerstein provides an illuminating overview of Dr. Fleming's career in terms of its effects on psychoanalysis in general and on his own career in particular.

Significantly, Fleming was for a number of years a college teacher before she became a physician, and education remained uppermost throughout her career. She was an inspiration to generations of students, and she assigned great importance to meetings among analytic educators at both local and national levels. She championed the setting of precise didactic methods and subjecting them to constant and repeated evaluations.

In one of the early papers, “Freud's Concept of Self-analysis: Its Relevance for Psychoanalytic Training,” Fleming gives a detailed historical survey of Freud's changing views on analysis for the analyst, starting with its origins in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess.

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