Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To search for a specific phrase…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

Did you write an article’s title and the article did not appear in the search results? Or do you want to find a specific phrase within the article? Go to the Search section and write the title or phrase surrounded by quotations marks in the “Search for Words or Phrases in Context” area.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Marcus, P. (1995). The Problem of the Passions: Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Social Theory by Cynthia Burack New York: New York University Press, 1994, x + 140 pp., $35.00Treating the Adult Survivor of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Psychoanalytic Perspective by Jody Messler Davies and Mary Gail Frawley New York: BasicBooks/HarperCollins, 1994, xii + 259 pp., $35.00. Psa. Books, 6(3):351-360.

(1995). Psychoanalytic Books, 6(3):351-360

The Problem of the Passions: Feminism, Psychoanalysis, and Social Theory by Cynthia Burack New York: New York University Press, 1994, x + 140 pp., $35.00Treating the Adult Survivor of Childhood Sexual Abuse: A Psychoanalytic Perspective by Jody Messler Davies and Mary Gail Frawley New York: BasicBooks/HarperCollins, 1994, xii + 259 pp., $35.00

Review by:
Paul Marcus, Ph.D.

Cynthia Burack, an Assistant Professor of Political Science at George Washington University, has written a thoughtful, critical contribution to the fields of political theory, feminist theory, and psychoanalysis. Her thesis, she says, is that for some time now women have typically been characterized as warm, nurturing caregivers with a fundamentally enhanced capacity for attachment and compassion. Feminists, however, are considered full of rage and devoid of the feelings that are “natural” to women. Asks Burack, how, then, have feminists dealt with this dualism and, more specifically, with what she calls, following Hume, the “disagreeable” passions? Burack claims that what has too often been deemphasized or missing from discussions of women's psychology is an understanding of women as ambivalent: both empathic and enraged, loving and hating. She shows how the selective use and interpretation of early psychoanalytic ideas by feminists has deemphasized or denied the disagreeable passions of rage, envy, greed, hatred, and aggression in women and in their relationships. One of the important unintended negative consequences of this omission may be that feminists have reproduced “a patriarchal horror of enraged women” (p. 112).

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2020, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.