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Aguayo, J. (1986). Charcot and Freud: Some Implications of Late 19th Century French Psychiatry and Politics for the Origins of Psychoanalysis. Psychoanal. Contemp. Thought, 9(2):223-260.

(1986). Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought, 9(2):223-260

Charcot and Freud: Some Implications of Late 19th Century French Psychiatry and Politics for the Origins of Psychoanalysis

Joseph Aguayo, Ph.D.

The Historical Problem

One hundred years ago, Sigmund Freud, a struggling 29-year-old Viennese physician, received a traveling fellowship to study in Paris with Europe's most renowned neurologist, Jean Martin Charcot. Freud was later to remember the experience of this 4½-month stay, from October 1885 to February 1886, as catalytic in turning him toward the practice of medical psychopathology and away from a less financially promising career in research neurology.

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