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Kirsch, T.B. Alto, P. (2012). The Red Book, by C. G. Jung. Also known as Liber Novus, edited and Introduced by Sonu Shamdasani. W. W. Norton, New York, 2009, 371 pp.. Psychodyn. Psych., 40(2):350-353.

(2012). Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 40(2):350-353

The Red Book, by C. G. Jung. Also known as Liber Novus, edited and Introduced by Sonu Shamdasani. W. W. Norton, New York, 2009, 371 pp.

Review by:
Thomas B. Kirsch, M.D.

Palo Alto, CA

The Red Book is based upon Jung's personal diary which he began in November 1913 and concluded in April 1914. There he recorded a series of spontaneous fantasies which had impressed themselves on his psyche and which he entered into a series of black books. Later he copied these fantasies into a large leather Red Book which he called Liber Novus, using medieval calligraphy and adding a series of paintings. The genesis of this work is described in Memories, Dreams, Reflections, Chapter 6, “Confrontation with the Unconscious.” Since the publication of this work in 1963, the public has known only of the existence of The Red Book. However, Jung had shared his inner experiences with his wife and close colleagues.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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