Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To quickly return from a journal’s Table of Contents to the Table of Volumes…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

You can return with one click from a journal’s Table of Contents (TOC) to the Table of Volumes simply by clicking on “Volume n” at the top of the TOC (where n is the volume number).

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Cortina, M. Spring, S. (2012). Psychoanalysis and Motivational Systems. A New Look, by Joseph D. Lichtenberg, Frank M. Lachmann, and James L. Fosshage. Psychoanalytic Inquiry Book, Rutledge New York Psychoanalytic Inquiry Series, 2011, 136 pp.. Psychodyn. Psych., 40(2):357-364.

(2012). Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 40(2):357-364

Psychoanalysis and Motivational Systems. A New Look, by Joseph D. Lichtenberg, Frank M. Lachmann, and James L. Fosshage. Psychoanalytic Inquiry Book, Rutledge New York Psychoanalytic Inquiry Series, 2011, 136 pp.

Review by:
Mauricio Cortina, M.D.

Sliver Spring, M.D.

In this slim volume Joseph Lichtenberg joins his close colleagues Frank Lachmann and James Fosshage in revising his landmark (1989) book Psychoanalysis and Motivational Systems in several new directions. The authors respond to critiques made within the past 20 years and incorporate some of the arguments they find more convincing. They also incorporate newer ideas that have emerged during this period. They update dynamic systems theory and use newer versions of dynamic systems and complexity theory to help the development of an organizational model of the mind. A dynamic systems perspective allows us to view each person as an open system that is self organizing in interaction with others, while being composed of multiple subsystems. Some of the essential properties of this model of the mind are its capacity to recognize, store, access and transmit information. Developmental processes, as well as the process of change in psychotherapy have nonlinear effects with emergent properties. That is, phases of development or treatment do not generally follow a simple linear path. When tipping points are reached in development or treatment (for instance, during episodes of ruptures and repairs) changes that follow can develop emergent transformative qualities—for better or for worse. According to the authors all these concepts serve as a contemporary meta-theory for psychoanalysis.

The authors make another interesting use of complexity theory. In chapter four they use the concept of fractals as a way to explain by analogy how multiple mental states can coexist amidst a sense of self sameness and unity.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.