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Gazzillo, F. Gorman, B. Bush, M. Silberschatz, G. Mazza, C. Faccini, F. Crisafulli, V. Alesiani, R. De Luca, E. (2017). Reliability and Validity of the Interpersonal Guilt Rating Scale-15: A New Clinician-Reporting Tool for Assessing Interpersonal Guilt According to Control-Mastery Theory. Psychodyn. Psych., 45(3):362-384.
   

(2017). Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 45(3):362-384

Reliability and Validity of the Interpersonal Guilt Rating Scale-15: A New Clinician-Reporting Tool for Assessing Interpersonal Guilt According to Control-Mastery Theory

Francesco Gazzillo, Ph.D., Bernard Gorman, Ph.D., Marshall Bush, Ph.D., George Silberschatz, Ph.D., Cristina Mazza, Ph.D., Filippo Faccini, Ph.D., Valeria Crisafulli, Ph.D., Roberta Alesiani, M.S. and Emma De Luca, Ph.D.

This article introduces the Interpersonal Guilt Rating Scale-15 (IGRS-15), a brief clinician-rated tool for the clinical assessment of interpersonal guilt as conceived in Control-Mastery Theory (CMT; Silberschatz, 2015; Weiss, 1993), and its psychometric proprieties. The items of the IGRS-15 were derived from the CMT clinical and empirical literature about guilt, and from the authors' clinical experiences. Twenty-eight clinicians assessed 154 patients with the IGRS-15, the patient self-reported Interpersonal Guilt Questionnaire-67 (IGQ-67; O'Connor, Berry, Weiss, Bush, & Sampson, 1997), and the Clinical Data Form (CDF; Westen & Shedler, 1999).

A semi-exploratory factor analysis pointed to a four-factor solution in line with the kinds of guilt described in CMT: Survivor guilt, Separation/disloyalty guilt, Omnipotent responsibility guilt, and Self-hate. The test-retest reliability of the IGRS-15 was good. Moreover, the IGRS-15 showed good concurrent and discriminant validity with the IGQ-67.

IGRS-15 represents a first step in the direction of supporting the clinical judgment about interpersonal guilt with an empirically sound and easy-to-use tool.

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