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Bernanke, J. McCommon, B. (2018). Training in Good Psychiatric Management for Borderline Personality Disorder in Residency: An Aide to Learning Supportive Psychotherapy for Challenging-to-Treat Patients. Psychodyn. Psych., 46(2):181-200.

(2018). Psychodynamic Psychiatry, 46(2):181-200

Training in Good Psychiatric Management for Borderline Personality Disorder in Residency: An Aide to Learning Supportive Psychotherapy for Challenging-to-Treat Patients

Joel Bernanke, M.D., M.Sc. and Benjamin McCommon, M.D.

Given many competing demands, psychotherapy training to competency is difficult during psychiatric residency. Good Psychiatric Management for borderline personality disorder (GPM) offers an evidence-based, simplified, psychodynamically informed framework for the outpatient management of patients with borderline personality disorder, one of the most challenging disorders psychiatric residents must learn to treat. In this article, we provide an overview of GPM, and show that training in GPM meets a requirement for training in supportive psychotherapy; builds on psychodynamic psychotherapy training; and applies to other severe personality disorders, especially narcissistic personality disorder. We describe the interpersonal hypersensitivity model used in GPM as a straightforward way for clinicians to collaborate with patients in organizing approaches to psychoeducation, treatment goals, case management, use of multiple treatment modalities, and safety. A modification of the interpersonal hypersensitivity model that includes intra-personal hypersensitivity can be used to address narcissistic problems often present in borderline personality disorder. We argue that these features make GPM ideally suited for psychiatry residents in treating their most challenging patients, provide clinical examples to illustrate these points, and report the key lessons learned by a psychiatry resident after a year of GPM supervision.

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