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Nicholson, T. (2016). Freud’s Studies on Hysteria 120th Anniversary Debate: Part 1. A Brief history of Hysteria. PEP Videostream, 1(9):18.

(2016). PEP Videostream, 1(9):18

Freud’s Studies on Hysteria 120th Anniversary Debate: Part 1. A Brief history of Hysteria Related Papers

Timothy Nicholson

Public engagement event at the Freud Museum London & funded by the UK National Institute of Health Research, to inform the general public about Hysteria – now known as conversion disorder or functional neurological disorder – and assess if Freud’s theories, specifically those in his seminal work ‘Studies on Hysteria’ are still relevant today. Initially there are introductory lectures on Hysteria (now known as Functional Neurological Disorder) the book itself, and then a summary of the book Studies on Hysteria. The debate then follows these lectures, considering the motion ‘Is Freud’s book Studies on Hysteria still relevant?’ – Debate aimed at the general public. Chaired by Dr Tim Nicholson (Institute of Psychiatry / Maudsley Hospital, London). Motion proposed by Richard Kanaan (Professor of Neuropsychiatry, Melbourne University) & Stephanie Howlett (Psychotherapist, Sheffield, UK). Motion opposed by Mark Edwards (Professor of Neurology, St George’s London) & Alan Carson (Reader in Neuropsychiatry, Edinburgh University).

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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