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Hibbard, S. (1994). An Empirical Study of the Differential Roles of Libidinous and Aggressive Shame Components in Normality and Pathology. Psychoanal. Psychol., 11(4):449-474.

(1994). Psychoanalytic Psychology, 11(4):449-474

An Empirical Study of the Differential Roles of Libidinous and Aggressive Shame Components in Normality and Pathology

Stephen Hibbard, Ph.D.

Eleven items from the Adapted Shame Rating Scale (Hobltizelle, 1987) and the Personal Feelings Questionnaire (Harder & Lewis, 1987) survived internal consistency analysis to construct a reliable (α = .96, Spearman-Brown corrected), two-factor (Disgraced/Humiliated and Bashful/Shy) Brief Shame Rating Scale. The first factor seemed to be a more malignant, aggressively determined form of shame; the second was a more benign, libidinously determined form. The two subscales significantly interact in predicting concomitant levels of psychopathology, level of shame, and narcissism. Consistent with psychoanalytic theory, dominance of the more aggressive Humiliated/Disgraced subscale is associated with psychopathology, shame, and narcissism. The findings suggest that healthy superego integration and identity formation are associated with a greater balance of libido and aggression.

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