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Maroda, K.J. (2007). Ethical Considerations of the Home Office. Psychoanal. Psychol., 24:173-179.

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(2007). Psychoanalytic Psychology, 24:173-179

Brief Reports

Ethical Considerations of the Home Office Related Papers

Karen J. Maroda, Ph.D., ABPP Author Information

The home office has a long tradition in psychoanalysis, based somewhat on the mistaken belief that Freud actually practiced out of his living quarters. The reality is that he practiced out of a completely separate apartment across the hall. This article examines the analyst's motivations for having a home office, as well as the potential impact of having one on the analyst's patients and own family. The home office is considered as fertile ground for acting out by both analyst and patient, and the corresponding ethical issues are discussed.

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