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Klein, M.C. (2010). Review of Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting, by Thomas H. Ogden, New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2009, 168 pp., $36.95.. Psychoanal. Psychol., 27(4):541-543.

(2010). Psychoanalytic Psychology, 27(4):541-543

Review of Rediscovering Psychoanalysis: Thinking and Dreaming, Learning and Forgetting, by Thomas H. Ogden, New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2009, 168 pp., $36.95.

Reviewed by
Michael C. Klein, Ph.D.

Thomas Ogden has deepened our understanding of how to make therapeutic use of strong emotional reactions to our patients as much as any contemporary psychoanalytic writer. Thomas Ogden's most recent book is an enjoyable work that is capable of affecting readers in both intellectually challenging and emotionally resonant ways. His writing has long been admired for its incisive and precise explication of topics such as projective identification and the “analytic third” (Ogden, 1979; Ogden, 1994), and the reader gets a healthy dose of his theoretical style. There is also much fresh and playful prose that is highly autobiographical and contrasts substantially from his other work.

Rediscovering Psychoanalysis consists of eight chapters that may best be thought of in two parts. Throughout the first four chapters, we see Ogden looking back and sharing his vast experience as clinician, teacher, supervisor and lifelong student of psychoanalytic practice. The early chapters are largely written in the first person voice, and surveys Ogden's career dating all the way back to his early years of training. These chapters are sprinkled with clinical gems, treasured memories of training, practicing, and how his life as an analyst has affected and informed other personal interests such as fiction and film. The writing is almost conversational, including occasional digressions, as if he remembered something as he was considering his many experiences. For example, at one point he painstakingly explains what a particularly evocative short story by Lydia Davis (2007) entitled “What You Learn About the Baby” taught him about the psychoanalytic process.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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