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Malone, J.C. Piacentini, E. Speranza, M. (2018). Reclaiming the Developmental Lens for Adolescent Formulation and Diagnosis: Application of the PDM-2 to Clinical Cases. Psychoanal. Psychol., 35(3):339-345.
  

(2018). Psychoanalytic Psychology, 35(3):339-345

Reclaiming the Developmental Lens for Adolescent Formulation and Diagnosis: Application of the PDM-2 to Clinical Cases

Johanna C. Malone, Ph.D., Eleonora Piacentini, Ph.D. and Mario Speranza, M.D., Ph.D.

We emphasize the value of a developmental framework for adolescent diagnosis and clinical formulation. Clinical use of diagnostic approaches constructed for either children or adults risks misunderstanding, and perhaps even misdiagnosing, symptoms and experiences that may be tied to the psychological, social, and biological changes inherent in this phase of life. To illustrate a more developmentally attuned approach to clinical formulation, we apply the adolescent section of the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual, 2nd Edition (PDM-2) to 2 clinical cases, 1 an early adolescent and 1 a late adolescent. We discuss them in terms of 3 PDM axes: mental functioning (MA Axis), emerging personality patterns (PA Axis), and subjective experience of symptom patterns (SA Axis).

[This is a summary excerpt from the full text of the journal article. The full text of the document is available to journal subscribers on the publisher's website here.]

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