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If you know the bibliographic details of a journal article, use the Journal Section to find it quickly. First, find and click on the Journal where the article was published in the Journal tab on the home page. Then, click on the year of publication. Finally, look for the author’s name or the title of the article in the table of contents and click on it to see the article.

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Issroff, J. (2005). Attachment Trauma: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder and Multiplicity edited by Valerie Sinason (Brunner-Routledge, Hove, East Sussex; Taylor & Francis, New York, 2002). 280 pp.. Psychoanal. Psychother., 19(2):180-182.

(2005). Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, 19(2):180-182

Attachment Trauma: Working with Dissociative Identity Disorder and Multiplicity edited by Valerie Sinason (Brunner-Routledge, Hove, East Sussex; Taylor & Francis, New York, 2002). 280 pp.

Review by:
Judith Issroff

Like the topic of dissociation itself, chapters comprising this book vary in quality and style, and do not form an integrated or comprehensive whole, but the variety of contributions make for compelling reading that informs and enriches one in original and unexpected ways. So it is an important collation of views. One emerges with considerable respect for the diverse authors who have had the courage to grapple with people whose lives and selves have been shattered and fragmented through complex, cumulative human-generated traumata, at times originating within families of victims-witnesses and also perpetrators, of extreme, perverse, sadistic and criminal nature. Accordingly, understandably, these deeply damaged people present their varieties of defensive personalities/alternate selves to therapists in ways that challenge the credulity, quickness of response, cunning in ‘therapeutic holding’ and emotional robustness of any professional or other who encounters such a personality compendium-person.

Such encounters are inevitably difficult, including for those who themselves have previously encountered their like, and scepticism is an easy way out — as with deniers of the Holocaust: even reading is not easy. To deal with but one ‘patient’ client is demanding, to be forced to deal with several in the form of but one certainly demands ‘nothing short of everything’, including flexibility in therapeutic responsiveness and the development of new coping strategies.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

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