Customer Service | Help | FAQ | PEP-Easy | Report a Data Error | About
:
Login
Tip: To find an Author in a Video…

PEP-Web Tip of the Day

To find an Author in a Video, go to the Search Section found on the top left side of the homepage. Then, select “All Video Streams” in the Source menu. Finally, write the name of the Author in the “Search for Words or Phrases in Context” area and click the Search button.

For the complete list of tips, see PEP-Web Tips on the PEP-Web support page.

Piotrowski, Z.A. (1955). Beck, Samuel J.: The Six Schizophrenias: Reaction Patterns in Children And Adults [New York: Am. Orthopsychiat. Assoc., 1954. Pp. VIII + 238.]. Psychoanal. Rev., 42(3):309-311.

(1955). Psychoanalytic Review, 42(3):309-311

Book Reviews

Beck, Samuel J.: The Six Schizophrenias: Reaction Patterns in Children And Adults [New York: Am. Orthopsychiat. Assoc., 1954. Pp. VIII + 238.]

Review by:
Z. A. Piotrowski

Attempts at forging the Rorschach method into a diagnostic tool are so rare that this book deserves close and careful attention. The unique feature of the investigation reported in this book was the matching of 120 clinical psychiatric symptoms occurring in schizophrenia with Rorschach components considered to be the psychological equivalents of those clinical symptoms. This matching was an extremely difficult task particularly because the Rorschach system used by Beck provided insufficient techniques for the evaluation of the patients’ overt motor behavior and of the quality and intensity of their emotions. Rorschach records of 40 patients were used in the setting up of the six types of schizophrenia with no less than four patients per type. Although all of these patients had been diagnosed by the psychiatrists as schizophrenic, only three of the six types emerging from the Rorschach analyses were discriminated by them clinically. The procedure was as follows: The psychologists took the list of 120 clinical psychiatric symptoms (or traits), made up by the psychiatrists from authoritative texts on the diagnosis of schizophrenia, analyzed the patients’ Rorschach records to see which of the clinical traits the patients seemed to possess, which they seemed not to have, and which could be neither confirmed nor denied, and ranked them on a rating scale.

[This is a summary or excerpt from the full text of the book or article. The full text of the document is available to subscribers.]

Copyright © 2019, Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing, ISSN 2472-6982 Customer Service | Help | FAQ | Download PEP Bibliography | Report a Data Error | About

WARNING! This text is printed for personal use. It is copyright to the journal in which it originally appeared. It is illegal to redistribute it in any form.