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(1957). Book Notes and Reviews. Psychoanal. Rev., 44:110-116.

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(1957). Psychoanalytic Review, 44:110-116

Books

Book Notes and Reviews

Greenacre, Phyllis, (Editor). Affective Disorders: Psychoanalytic Contribution to Their Study. [New York: Intern. Univ. Press, Inc., pp. 212, 1953. $3.00.]

This very attractive volume, in large and beautiful print, contains papers read at the American Psychoanalytic Association meetings. It was edited by Phyllis Greenacre, a leading and creative authority on emotions who also wrote the foreword. Edward Bibring contributed a chapter on The Mechanism of Depression, Edith Jacobson wrote a Contribution to the Metapsychology of Cyclothymic Depression, Elizabeth Zetzel discussed The Depressive Position, George Gero explained An Equivalent of Depression, Anorexia, and Maurits Katan discoursed on Mania and the Pleasure Principle. The main subject, matter of all chapters is depression in the psychoses and in the psychotic borderline states. This is a rare book insofar as all authors argue from the same basic theoretical position which is the genetic theory of personality development as formulated originally by Freud and Abraham. The contributors are also consistent with one another in all essentials. The reasoning is clasically psychoanalytic in the sense that a thorough and

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